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 Post subject: Draven Reviews: Telethought Pad
PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2012 12:46 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 83
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Effect: Telethought Pad
Artist: Chris Kenworthey
Producers: Chris Kenworthey
Link: http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/S13781
Retail Price: $38.50 USD small pad $55.00 USD large
Learning Difficulty: Easy
Notes: This prop will need refills if you plan to use it often.
Features:
• Telethought Pad
• Instruction Booklet

This is the newest creation from Chris Kenworthey that puts the power of telepathy into the palms of your hand. This pad allows the spectator to draw anything they want, and without even touching the pad you can tell with precise details what was drawn, be it a name, a number, a picture, ANYTHING!

When I saw this product demonstrated at the local magic shop I thought to my-self “this thing has potential.” That all quickly changed within three minutes of actually owning this piece of crap device. Suffice it to say that the pad is gimmicked. I can’t go into too many details on why the gimmick sucks, but I will say it is INCREDIBLY angle sensitive, to the point of being more of a hindrance than a necessary evil. You’ll see what I mean if you search this product out for demo videos on Youtube you can find a video by Fantasma Magic that actually flashes the gimmick around the .30 second mark.

Like any good mentalist pad the idea is to have a prop that looks normal, and to get a lot of road work out of it. The second problem with this product comes in to play when you consider that eventually you’re going to need to get refills. The pad isn’t designed to allow you to easily just insert refills that you could buy at an office supply store, so either you’ll need to A) send the pad back into Chris to have him refill it for you, or B) buy a new pad. For a minimum charge of at least $35 dollars per pad you could probably go with another product that delivers about the same function, and save money in the long run while doing it.

The instruction manual is full of really nice presentation ideas so if this is your first introduction into mind reading pad device then you’ve got quite a lot to hit the ground running with. The instructions has clear pictures detailing how to handle the pad, that includes a lot of hand washing; a detail that I think really is more a magician driven need than a mentalist one. I don’t imagine a mentalist would feel the need to justify that the pad is “normal” by showing both sides of it but I digress. Regardless of how carefully you follow the instructions in your handling it still comes back to the angle sensitive nature of the gimmick making this thing impractical for actual work, and reducing it to nothing more than a cool magician’s toy at best. For upwards of $60 bucks I think I’d rather go buy a couple fancy card decks the kids are playing with now days instead.

When I give my product scores below I am measuring them on a scale of 1 to 10. 1 Being absolute the worst score possible, and 10 being the absolute best, making a score of five average. The four points that I grade upon is Product Quality, Teaching Quality, Practicality and Overall Quality.

Product Quality: 2
The Telethought Pad was plagued by a list of issues from the start. The fact that the pad is hard to refill, and an unreliable gimmick with severe angle sensitivity coupled with a high price tag make this one of the worst mentalist products I’ve purchased in a long time.

Teaching Quality: 6
The instructions are well written, the pictures are clear, and the additional performance ideas are of value, but even a well written instruction book isn’t enough to save a bad gimmick.

Practicality: 2
Not practical at all. Even the demo video I watched for it flashed the gimmick. It is angle sensitive as edited. This product won’t make it out of your junk drawer.

Overall Quality: 2
Quite possible one of the lowest scores I’ve ever given a product. I just can’t recommend it for any reason. It is a waste of time and money. This product earned the Draven’s Seal of NOT APPROVED!


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 Post subject: Re: Draven Reviews: Telethought Pad
PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2012 2:44 am 
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born to perform.

Joined: 22 Mar 2003
Posts: 3251
Location: of my spongeballs eludes me.
Thank You for this review. Great to know so as to apply the $ on quality gims.


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 Post subject: Re: Draven Reviews: Telethought Pad
PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 1:28 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 19 Apr 2012
Posts: 3
Ok, I have the pad, and I use it. I angle tested it too. You can routine your way around it, and I had a face to face with Chris. The two angles one must watch out for is 1) The angle in which you are supposed see the thought, and 2) the pad straight up and down, as if you were the spectator, naturally closing the pad. When the pad is in the vertical position, they might catch the angle.

If you own the pad, I will tell you how to take out those spots.

Method A: You are going to model for the spectator what to do. This is Chris Kenworthy's handling. You open the pad up, mime drawing the thought, and placing the pad face down on the table without closing it. This allows you to close the pad on your terms once they actually do this...since you modeled what they are supposed to do. What you actually do, is close the pad, with the gimmick and the back sheet of the pad, killing all the angles. I worked with this on two laymen yesterday. And what I will add to this is a couple of subtleties that will aid in Chris's handling. You want to start at a corner of the table so that the end of the table is near them, the the corner side is adjacent (so when you turn around you'll be 90 degrees from their position). Once they turn the pad face down, the pad ends up close to the edge of the table...Spiral side closest to the edge. (If this doesn't happen, I can imagine you can turn the pad to your advantage naturally as you patter) You lift the gaff and the back of the pad as one and let it swing off the table naturally hanging, waiting for you to scissor/crocodile sandwich the pad closed again killing the angles. Once the pad is in horizontal position, you can flip the back of the pad in it's original position, get your thought, and place the pad in the pocket. (I own the smaller one) Using the back can reenforce that you can't get a peek.

Method B: No table. Duh, use your hand or another spectators hands as an option. (Peter Woods handling I got demo'd for me @ Barry's Magic Shop, Rockville Maryland...which practically sold me on the pad being a must-have utility device) Hold the pad in your hand as they draw and then flip it closed horizontal thus killing the angle. So basically you are holding the pad toward them as they draw on it as if they are drawing on your palm. Look away, as you put it away, get your thought.

Method C: (MINE) Very bold, you need testicular fortitude to do this. Open the pad, put it in their hand tell them to draw - close it ("quickly so no one catches a glimpse"), and then flip the pad face down and KEEP it face down. Yes I model this for them before I turn around. After all that... You need to pull them forward (toward yourself) if they are surrounded while then turning their palm face up. Kills all the possible angles and gives you your thought. (I usually only keep my sponge balls in my left pocket) I lead them as I turn my body to put the pad in my pocket.

a) Some points to remember on my handling, most people are right handed-So the left pocket thing will work. b) There is an angle directly above and close to their body that it's possible to see the thought, you want to choose a tall person or mime them to keep the hand away from their body (this is natural though) as they close the pad - make the thought more sacred through audience control. c) Tell them to concentrate on the picture until the very last moment they close their pad up, cause "no one will see it again." This helps them focus on their image or thought they put down - away from the gaff. Once they close the pad and turn it face down, keeping it closed. Game is over until you make your wrist turn walk away. a.2) As I work at a bar, I have adapted it for the spectator to place the pad on the bar. As they walk back, when I turn around, I get the thought.

So these are possible work arounds for you who own or will buy the pad. It's worth it. If you can't refill these pads yourself, then you either are a [edited], or just want a reason. It's PAPER! Secondly, if you want to save on paper, just don't tear the sheet out, and scribble out what the last person did - use the open space. 1) Might not be classy, but it seems pretty natural to do that. I serve food also, so having a pad like this makes sense from taking orders for people.

Vouthynar


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 Post subject: Re: Draven Reviews: Telethought Pad
PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 12:50 am 
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Penguin

Joined: 10 May 2010
Posts: 83
I will give you one thing. Testicular fortitude, as you put it, is certainly something you'd need if you plan to work with this piece of crap device. Not for me man. This doesn't do a darn thing for me that I couldn't have done with some carbon paper and a clipboard of paper.


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