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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:10 pm 
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born to perform.

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I was thinking 2, 2, 9 works b/c one twin is technically younger than the other. But now I'm confused when you said, "If it is the 'youngest child' version, then (2,2,9) works if we allow twins." How could it not be twins, not counting adoption?


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:28 pm 
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I sort of assumed that the ages are rounded down to the nearest integer, so one kid could be 2.05 and another could be 2.95 years old. Poor Mom :-(

Let's not overthink this if it's not already too late :-)


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 5:57 pm 
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It all comes down to how the 3rd question is worded. This will determine which answer is correct.

I've always seen this question read "The oldest kid has red hair"... So it would have to be 2/2/9. This makes the final answer more obvious because the "oldest kid" HAS to be the nine-year-old. 1/6/6 does not work because it's "kid", not "kids" (therefore two 6-year-olds don't count).

In your case, I would have to agree that 1/6/6 would be the answer to "the youngest kid" question. I just assumed it was the same question so I thought it was 2/2/9. :) But the little variation in the third question threw a wrench into things.

I think you should say "youngest kid", and not just "youngest". This will also specify the NUMBER of kids involved which makes all the difference in finding out which is the right answer. If you just say "youngest", then someone can argue (like you have) that even among twins there's a younger one of the two twins.

Oh well. :)

digitaltrip


Last edited by digitaltrip on Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 5:57 pm 
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born to perform.

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Location: Toronto, Canada
If their age is 6,6,1 then they add up to 13...and we all know theres no house numbered 13.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 6:02 pm 
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Ninjax wrote:
If their age is 6,6,1 then they add up to 13...and we all know theres no house numbered 13.


I guess 2/2/9 doesn't work then either... Then what is the answer?? :)

digitaltrip


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:12 pm 
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3,3, 4 adds up to 10 not 13 so why doesnt it work?


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 11:12 pm 
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born to perform.

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Here's the explanation for those of you who haven't got it by now:

You know there are three children who ages multiply to give you 36. From here you should be able to make the following options for the ages:

1 1 36
1 2 18
1 3 12
1 4 9
1 6 6
2 2 9
2 3 6
3 3 4

The next clue is that their ages add to give you the house number. So, before worrying about what the house number is, add the ages together:

1 1 36 = 38
1 2 18 = 21
1 3 12 = 16
1 4 9 = 14
1 6 6 = 13
2 2 9 = 13
2 3 6 = 11
3 3 4 = 10

So, before the man goes to the mailbox to see what the house number is, he knows, for example, that if the house number is 38, that the ages are 1, 1 & 36. If the house number is 14, then the ages are 1, 4 & 9 (etc...). But, what if the house number is 13? Two sets of ages add to give 13. So, if the house number is 13, then the surveyer will need more information. The fact that he needs more information tells us that the house number must be 13. That narrows the ages down to the following:

1 6 6
2 2 9

The last clue is that the youngest has brown hair. With 2, 2 & 9, there is no youngest. Therefore, the only remaining option is 1, 6, & 6.

Of course, you could get technical & say, "There is too a youngest with the two-year-old twins. One had to come out first." This is true, but the desired answer, of course, is 1, 6 & 6.

How do you guys supposed this riddle could be worded to remove any of the possible exceptions? Another exception would be if one of the two-year-olds were adopted. I suppose the surveyer could ask, "How many biological children do you have?" What could be said to eliminate the exception of one twin technically being younger?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 5:09 pm 
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born to perform.

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Location: Toronto, Canada
I know that, but there aint no houses numbered 13 b/c the number is considered not lucky. Therefore, the house cannot be numbered 13.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2004 12:24 am 
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Posts: 632
Do you really think there are no houses anywhere numbered 13? There's always at least one exception to everything...


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2004 8:08 am 
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Location: markbaluk.com
i see houses numbered 13 all the time what are yu talking about?

--MARK--


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