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PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 7:34 am 
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born to perform.

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Location: of my spongeballs eludes me.
My widely accepted opinion in this 6 X 6 space that I abide in is that you are absolutely at a fantastic time in your life to perform amazing feats of childhood distractions.

Here's an example of what challenges await you;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ey137Z2rw3s&feature=related

Maybe you can perform at venues where the children tend to stay on their side of the playground;
http://sillymagic.com/dvds.htm


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 10:43 am 
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The only bad thing I noticed was that you mouth inflate balloons and give them out. I think that is bad for 2 reasons. One, a straight 260 can be used as a sword and then kids start a sword fight until someone runs into something and gets hurt.

Two, when you use a pump you have a bag of air, when you mouth inflate you give them a bag of germs. Other than these 2 things GREAT SHOW


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 3:56 pm 
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EZRhythm, you have gotten a lot of hits on your video-- congrats! I read through the comments and saw some of the mixed reactions. First off, I just wanted to say that you will always have people that like your show, and those that do not-- especially when it is magicians doing the critiquing because we all have our own thoughts on how something should be done. There is nothing wrong in that, we just all have to remember that our way is not the only way. Do not let it get to you! The kids really seem to be having a great time, which in the end, is what really matters. Quite simply, I enjoyed the performance because the kids did. I didn't look at it as a magician, which were the ones commenting on YouTube. I looked at it as a parent. Everyone wants their child to be happy on their special day--- and it seemed everyone was, adults included. So good job!

Thank you for sharing your video with the kids here at the forum. If I may be so bold, you don't appear to be a teen? It can sometimes be hard to tell on YouTube videos. My daughter has been mistaken as being much older in hers, which is why I was wondering.

You are right in the point of view that it is a good idea for the kids here to see the challenges that they will be against at a children's party. Get a room full of sugar-hyped kids and anything is possible and it is important for them to know how to deal with any situation. Now my daughter's styling is very much opposite of yours--- where your routine is full of comedy, my daughter's has very little. She captures and holds the attention of the children by storytelling. We are currently brainstorming on doing a new routine and coming up with ideas. Although it will still be storytelling based, she is thinking of adding a few more comical aspects to it. Time will tell how it comes out.

Again, good job on making the kids happy!!

~ Kristen

P.S. As a parent, I do have to say I definitely agree with Paddy. Perhaps a pump would be a wise investment.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 10:39 pm 
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Location: of my spongeballs eludes me.
I'm terribly sorry that I have misled as the performer in the vid isn't me.

Quality commentary though, Thank You just the same!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 12:42 am 
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Hi guys, I'm newer to the scene but I've done four kid shows, 2 for the cub scouts, and 2 birthday parties (not bragging here).

Anyway I have experienced a few things and was looking for some insight.

1. Six is probably the starting age for kids magic. Less than this and it's not only hard to hold their attention, but they don't get it.

2. Kids enjoy watching the grown ups do magic as well. So it's okay to bring grown-ups on stage.

3. My acts are running up to an hour long when I'm trying to keep them shorter.

4. Have the birthday kid pick all the assistants.

5. I like to give them a gift at the end. Any good ways.

6. Are balloons absolutely necessary?

That's just to start.

Chris


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 10:02 am 
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casmith518 wrote:
Hi guys, I'm newer to the scene but I've done four kid shows, 2 for the cub scouts, and 2 birthday parties (not bragging here).

Anyway I have experienced a few things and was looking for some insight.

1. Six is probably the starting age for kids magic. Less than this and it's not only hard to hold their attention, but they don't get it.

2. Kids enjoy watching the grown ups do magic as well. So it's okay to bring grown-ups on stage.

3. My acts are running up to an hour long when I'm trying to keep them shorter.

4. Have the birthday kid pick all the assistants.

5. I like to give them a gift at the end. Any good ways.

6. Are balloons absolutely necessary?

That's just to start.

Chris


1. Nope...You can perform for much younger than six...the goal isn't to amaze them anyway...at their stage of development EVERYTHING is magical. Your goal is to keep them happy and entertained...there is much more than magic to a kidshow.

2. TOTALLY AGREE! I always use at least one adult in my show.

3. Your show is in YOUR control. An hour is too long...but if you wanna give your clients more for their money, then it's up to you. It is your show. 35-40 minutes is plenty enough for ANY kids show. If your shows always seem to reach an hour then this is possibly the reason you can't keep the attention of kids under the age of 6...

4. I don't fully agree with this one...what if they choose an unacceptable assistant? I wouldn't give any child that kind of power over my show (It can ultimately test your patience and heavily impact the outcome of the show.)

5. Gifts are great!

6. Balloons aren't really necessary...but I choose to use them...

These responses come from my experience in kidshows...so you can take them or leave it.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:25 am 
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Quote:
1. Nope...You can perform for much younger than six...the goal isn't to amaze them anyway...at their stage of development EVERYTHING is magical. Your goal is to keep them happy and entertained...there is much more than magic to a kidshow.


I couldn't agree with you more Kyle! Very well said.

When going to a show you can call yourself a Magician, but first and foremost you are an ENTERTAINER. My daughter can quite successfully hold the attention of younger children easily for a 30 minute show. That is the longest show she does.

I also agree with Kyle that no one should control your show, but you. Do not let a child, or a parent, force your assistant on you. By evaluating your audience you will be able to determine who is best suited for the next magic bit in your show. My daughter, who also uses the birthday child in her show, always sends the birthday child a personalized postcard with her picture on it before the party so that they will be excited to meet her when she arrives and hopefully won't be so shy. If the child is really young my daughter will also spend a little time with the birthday child before the party while my husband and I get her show set up. It is a scenario that has worked well for us. We have never had a bad result with a birthday child-- the youngest being 3-- that we have used.

Although, cute story with one 3 year old party we did. We arrived and at first she was shy hiding behind her mom. The mom encouraged her to show our daughter where the postcard was--- my daughter quietly asked her if she would take her hand and show her--- the little girl led my daughter into the kitchen where it was on fridge. My daughter of course smiled and made a big deal about how special she felt and thanked the little girl. Then the little girl told her how she had made her a present and raced off to get it. It was a bunch of colored paper all glued together with scribbles and pictures everywhere. My daughter smiled and praised her as if it were a Matisse. That work of art is still hanging in my daughter's room.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 12:09 pm 
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kristenl wrote:
Quote:
1. Nope...You can perform for much younger than six...the goal isn't to amaze them anyway...at their stage of development EVERYTHING is magical. Your goal is to keep them happy and entertained...there is much more than magic to a kidshow.


I couldn't agree with you more Kyle! Very well said.

When going to a show you can call yourself a Magician, but first and foremost you are an ENTERTAINER. My daughter can quite successfully hold the attention of younger children easily for a 30 minute show. That is the longest show she does.

I also agree with Kyle that no one should control your show, but you. Do not let a child, or a parent, force your assistant on you. By evaluating your audience you will be able to determine who is best suited for the next magic bit in your show. My daughter, who also uses the birthday child in her show, always sends the birthday child a personalized postcard with her picture on it before the party so that they will be excited to meet her when she arrives and hopefully won't be so shy. If the child is really young my daughter will also spend a little time with the birthday child before the party while my husband and I get her show set up. It is a scenario that has worked well for us. We have never had a bad result with a birthday child-- the youngest being 3-- that we have used.

Although, cute story with one 3 year old party we did. We arrived and at first she was shy hiding behind her mom. The mom encouraged her to show our daughter where the postcard was--- my daughter quietly asked her if she would take her hand and show her--- the little girl led my daughter into the kitchen where it was on fridge. My daughter of course smiled and made a big deal about how special she felt and thanked the little girl. Then the little girl told her how she had made her a present and raced off to get it. It was a bunch of colored paper all glued together with scribbles and pictures everywhere. My daughter smiled and praised her as if it were a Matisse. That work of art is still hanging in my daughter's room.


The Elf Queen has spoken :wink: :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 12:51 pm 
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kristenl, do you or anyone ever film any of your daughter's shows? I totally understand if you don't want to share it if the patter is a secret. :)


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 3:27 pm 
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Quote:
The Elf Queen has spoken


ROTFL . Okay, you got me there Kyle. In fact, you <almost> made me spit out my Dr. Pepper! :lol:

Sebishungry, we tape as many performances as we can, and rehearsals too. It is a good tool in which to learn from. That way you can see what you are doing right--- and what you are doing wrong. The public shows are easy to tape, but the quality is harder because we have to leave our camera unmanned so we can't zoom or follow her. Honestly, though, we have been very fortunate with people letting us tape at private parties as well. Some have even agreed to let us use the videos for promotional purposes. We never use a child's name however to protect their privacy. At a recent past public show an audience member, unknown to us at the time, filmed her performance. He got a great shot of her. We were able to acquire a copy of it for future use on a promotional video.

As to the patter, the majority of it is all original. There is one small routine that she does by Arthur Stead, however she has even changed that about to reflect her re-working of the routine.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 4:50 pm 
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I will share my opinions on the 6 points.

1. I would say half of my shows are for children under six. Children at this age love having fun more than anything. 4 year olds definitely understand what possible and impossible are.

2. I would say it’s ok to have adults up if during a "family show". A birthday or a day care. No way. The people paying you are really wanting to see the children having fun more than anything. If you find a way to do it without taking away an opportunity for a child to come up then more power to you.

3. Try selling different packages. Offer a 35-45 minute show then a 1hr show for more money. I would say its a whole new ball game trying to entertain for an hour as opposed to the shorter times

4. Only pick the best assistant for each routine

5. I end my show with the bday child assisting me as I produce something for them to keep. No candy but a gift. A simple dove pan could work.

6. Balloons aren’t necessary but will make it a whole lot easier on you. People almost expect you to offer balloons. I get as many people praising my balloons as they do the show. Also a great add on to a party which means more money and happier clients.

Just my thoughts


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 5:42 pm 
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It is definitely the comedy mixed with the magic. The kids like someone who can laugh at themself.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:57 am 
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Are you honestly worth it, is the question?

If I was an adult and I hired a magician for my party, and some 15 year old dork( not directed at anybody) walked up doing magic tricks, unless he was pretty amazing or at least halfway decent, I would be pretty pissed.

So are you good enough to warrant taking peoples money?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 9:25 am 
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A good anwer to that is if you get referrals and callbacks. That is the true test. If you do, then you know you are doing what you were paid for, which is entertaining and that you are worth the money you ask for that talent.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:05 pm 
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An additional comment I would like to make is that I feel it is important to let the client know that you ARE a youth performer and then let them decide whether they want to hire you. We are always very upfront with them for the exact reason stated above.


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