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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 4:03 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 22 Mar 2005
Posts: 292
Location: CT
mbl16,
Hey, very cool that you want to get out there and start performing magic. Its a tuff business but keep your head up.
Here's some questions and advice (I do work a restaurant and lots of walk around gigs).
1. You said that you performed at senior centers and the like. Great. How did those shows go? Make sure that you take notes directly after a show or as soon as you get home when its fresh in your mind. figure out what worked and what didn’t. Not only effects but patter as well.
2. Live at the Jailhouse is a very good DVD. But the question rises, if you are not willing to put forth the time and the money into this are you ready. Hey I don't know you or your skill set so I can't answer it but you can.
3. Check your local SAM or IBM rings. See if there is a performer in your area that works at a restaurant. Go check them out. Not to steal tricks or patter but to see how they work the tables. See what you like about their style and what you don't. What will work for you and won't.
4. Always remember, its about entertaining. Making the customers happy and enjoy their stay at the establishment. Its about working with a team, including management, wait-staff and bus boys. Your not going solo here.
5. Last thing I can say from my own experience is that its always about the customer's enjoyment and doing what management wants from you not you having fun. Not to say I don't have fun when I work the restaurant, I do, but I always put the customer's first. If someone doesn’t want to see magic I'm doubly nice to them and make sure their stay is great.

Cheers
Adam


Last edited by space_ghost15 on Mon Apr 09, 2007 9:13 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 4:05 pm 
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born to perform.

Joined: 08 Jan 2007
Posts: 665
Location: A box next to wal-mart
mbl16 wrote:
Quote:
If there is a guy that is touching your things what do you do?


I have that all the time i simply say depending on if its examinable or not i say you can touch it aslong as you dont steal it i keep everything in my pocket. If somethings not examinable i try to do those tricks last.

Quote:
If the food comes during a trick what do you do?


I would leave if i am just starting the trick and if I am almost done with it i will leave unless they ask me to finish it.

thats what i would do




:D seems like you been studying, Just try and get the dvd you will be so much better off getting it then not getting it at all, but i think your half way there jsut keep praticing the tricks your going to do and go from there.

but try and save and get the dvd its the best guilde


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 4:14 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 22 Jan 2006
Posts: 306
k thxs for the advice i think im ready but to be sure im going to test my skills one last time before hand... Im working at a school dance and gonna see how that goes

space_ghost15: i take what you put here and put it to good use


thegenius3232: thanks i never really had to think about those questions when im performing i just think on the spot by asking myself real quick what i should do and whats my plan of attack.
Quote:
seems like you been studying, Just try and get the dvd you will be so much better off getting it then not getting it at all, but i think your half way there jsut keep praticing the tricks your going to do and go from there.
yes i have been studying by watching Criss angel and david blain... i even watch the demo videos here if i need a question answered and it helps (how sad is that lol)


but thx for the advice you guys gave me ima go practice for a bit now


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:01 pm 
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born to perform.

Joined: 08 Jan 2007
Posts: 665
Location: A box next to wal-mart
alright no problum, good luck~!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 5:25 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 22 Jan 2006
Posts: 306
ok what would be a good price for a 2-3 hour day at a restaurant working 2 days a week?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 5:38 pm 
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born to perform.

Joined: 20 Apr 2004
Posts: 2592
Location: Herts, England
i charge £150/$300 for a 2.5 hour performance, but i suggest you try maybe $75 for 3 hours. I would also only recomend you try for a job at a cheap restaurant, you dont want to be taking work from the pros.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 7:30 pm 
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Joined: 24 Jan 2003
Posts: 4110
Location: Milford OH
mbl16 wrote:
ok what would be a good price for a 2-3 hour day at a restaurant working 2 days a week?


In reading through this topic I have noticed a couple of things that indicate a problem on the horizon. MBL16 you are 16 years old, when someone suggested that you buy a DVD set that will teach you about restaurant work you said that you couldn't buy it.

From your questions it is obvious that you have never seen a restaurant magician, yet you want to be one. You ask if escapes are good for restaurant work. The answer should be obvious if you ever saw a performer. You question someone about the amount of hours he rehearsed per day, but as a professional magician working in restaurants, I'll tell you that it is true. Because of repeat customers that the party and stage boys don't need to worry about, we have to keep adding in new material all the time. Therefore our practice and rehearsal time is doubled from theirs.

This is a business, and business can be tough. If you are not very high quality, you'll find out how fast you can be fired and then blacklisted. Start going ;to ring meetings and learn from other magicians.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 8:58 pm 
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born to perform.

Joined: 08 Jan 2007
Posts: 665
Location: A box next to wal-mart
paddy wrote:
mbl16 wrote:
ok what would be a good price for a 2-3 hour day at a restaurant working 2 days a week?


In reading through this topic I have noticed a couple of things that indicate a problem on the horizon. MBL16 you are 16 years old, when someone suggested that you buy a DVD set that will teach you about restaurant work you said that you couldn't buy it.

From your questions it is obvious that you have never seen a restaurant magician, yet you want to be one. You ask if escapes are good for restaurant work. The answer should be obvious if you ever saw a performer. You question someone about the amount of hours he rehearsed per day, but as a professional magician working in restaurants, I'll tell you that it is true. Because of repeat customers that the party and stage boys don't need to worry about, we have to keep adding in new material all the time. Therefore our practice and rehearsal time is doubled from theirs.

This is a business, and business can be tough. If you are not very high quality, you'll find out how fast you can be fired and then blacklisted. Start going ;to ring meetings and learn from other magicians.




AMEN!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2007 10:36 pm 
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born to perform.

Joined: 31 Jan 2006
Posts: 616
Your hearing from the best, so you better take paddy's advice.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2007 1:07 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 22 Jan 2006
Posts: 306
ok... well like i said im performing for a school dance in about a month if all goes well i will give the restaurant a try i will do a few weeks with just tips to start then talk to the boss about getting paid


you think tyhat would be a good idea?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2007 1:39 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 22 Mar 2005
Posts: 292
Location: CT
The thing about Performing at a Restaurant is that its really like the major leagues of close up work.
You want to take your time and make sure your ready.
Close up work is very hard (not the effects but entertaining) and nothing will prepare you like performing.
Get out there and keep performing over and over again. Try to get different groups of people. Different ages, people who don't know you. This will give you the background you need to start performing at a Restaurant.

Remember, in Baseball no one gets drafted and goes right to the Major Leagues. They have to spend years in the Minors before they get a chance and sometimes their still not ready.
So for your benefit spend some time in the minors and work on all your skills. Then you'll knock them out at the Restaurants and you'll have them beating down your door. Patience.

Cheers,
Adam


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2007 2:06 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 22 Jan 2006
Posts: 306
k i guess that would be a better idea... build a reputation and at the same time practice i guess you guys are right i will practice more then see how it goes


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 2:32 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 12 Feb 2005
Posts: 98
The below is a very important rant, but if you do not like people ranting, please skip this post (however I highly encourage you to read it, as it does contain valuable information).

I am not about to argue about whether or not this person is old/mature/skilled enough to do shows because we already have topics about this but I am sick and tired of all the "You need to have a lot of money to make 3-4 acts."

And do you want to know why?

Because with $20 you can make 5 or so decent 10 minute acts, with $30 you can make 5 skilled 10 minute acts, and with about $35 you can make about 5 very skilled (I dare not use the word professional as professionals use a majority of their own effects most of the time) acts.

How?

Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic.

That one book has enough magic in it to make 10 close-up acts, and a stage act.

How much does such a book cost?

$1000? No

$100? No

$50? No

$25? No

But $15, and sometimes less if you buy a used one from Amazon!

Combine that with a set of cups and balls, some rope, a mood ring, a deck of cards, one silk, a book of matches, some sponge balls and 4-5 quarters, and you have more magic than you can learn and perform in a year; edited even two years is not enough to learn and perform everything in there.

How much, altogether, does all of this cost?

About as much as the amount you spend on two DVDs from Ellusionist (and sorry, but Penguin too..But just so I don't get this reply removed...Don't buy from Ellusionist and buy everything from Penguin...Ok).

So, you spend about $63 for a guide on restaurant magic (personally, I prefer, although I have never watched the DVD mentioned, Kirk Charls' Complete Guide to Restaurant Magic, and if you are on a tight budget, buy this and read it through a couple of times instead of buying the DVD) and about $40 on a book and all the props you will ever need for years to come and now have more magic than you will ever use, at least working in a Restaurant a couple of times a week.

It just bothers me how everyone thinks that you need to spend hundreds of dollars just to be able to build up 3 10-minute routines.

Please take this message to heart and learn from my mistakes. The only reason I can even post the above message is because I learned this lesson the hard way.

Best of luck to everyone and their magic,
~Magically Dave


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 6:37 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 09 May 2007
Posts: 37
You could also get Jay Sankey's DVD called The Real Work on Restaurants and Bars. He gives some good insight on those kinds of things, and the dvd is only $30 i think. Also you don't need to have that many tricks to perform restaurant magic (3-4 sets), we have a magician at our local TGI Fridays who does the same couple of tricks all the time, but everyone still knows and loves him. (However i would recommend having at least 2 sets). Also i would really become friendly with the management and staff before working at the restaurant. You want them to be on your side. Thats why another thing is that most of the tips you get need to go towards the staff, not you. Start working for maybe $25 an hour and see how that goes after a couple of months. At least 60% or more of the tips you recieve should go to the waiters and waitresses waiting those tables.
I am actually 16 and trying to get a job working restaurant magic during the summer. I believe I'm about ready, but i've gotten experienced advice from the above mentioned DVD plus two magicians i know personally who have a lot of experience in the business. I also know the management at the restaurant i plan to work at, and my dad has some connections with them as well because he has supervised fundraisers there for the last year or so.
My tip is to get some advice from magicians who really work in the field. Then try it out, and see how it goes. For a lot of things though, be prepared to learn the hard way. That's how most magicians have to do it. Oh, and get Sankey's DVD, definately.


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 6:40 pm 
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Penguin

Joined: 09 May 2007
Posts: 37
You could also get Jay Sankey's DVD called The Real Work on Restaurants and Bars. He gives some good insight on those kinds of things, and the dvd is only $30 i think. Also you don't need to have that many tricks to perform restaurant magic (3-4 sets), we have a magician at our local TGI Fridays who does the same couple of tricks all the time, but everyone still knows and loves him. (However i would recommend having at least 2 sets). Also i would really become friendly with the management and staff before working at the restaurant. You want them to be on your side. Thats why another thing is that most of the tips you get need to go towards the staff, not you. Start working for maybe $25 an hour and see how that goes after a couple of months. At least 60% or more of the tips you recieve should go to the waiters and waitresses waiting those tables.
I am actually 16 and trying to get a job working restaurant magic during the summer. I believe I'm about ready, but i've gotten experienced advice from the above mentioned DVD plus two magicians i know personally who have a lot of experience in the business. I also know the management at the restaurant i plan to work at, and my dad has some connections with them as well because he has supervised fundraisers there for the last year or so.
My tip is to get some advice from magicians who really work in the field. Then try it out, and see how it goes. For a lot of things though, be prepared to learn the hard way. That's how most magicians have to do it. Oh, and get Sankey's DVD, definately.


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