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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 3:14 am 
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Here's a mike that I just bought: http://www.abesofmaine.com/viewproduct~ ... ?KBID=5768

You will need a back-up mike, in the rare event that you have unexpected interference - had that during a recent gig. The interference didn't kick in until I hit the stage, despite the sound check and using the mike for announcements. It can happen with any wireless system.

Here's a cheaper mike: http://www.brilliant-electronics.com/wi ... vh101h.htm

I've used a $20 Memorex headset, for small gigs, that works well. Sometimes, the VHF mikes are easier to use, when avoiding interference. I've never had a problem with this one.

Here's a great source for inexpensive PAs: http://www.dak.com/index.cfm


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:42 am 
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I just use my marshall gutiar amp with a wired mic , Im looking for a wireless mic though .


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:52 pm 
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born to perform.

Joined: 05 Jan 2007
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Location: Visit my blog at magic-yeti.blogspot.com
dbaker_creator wrote:
tbwendt wrote:
Not super powerful but way more professional than a boombox - I think that would be pretty cheesy.


I've always found humor in the suggestion that "professional looking" magician equipment is somehow superior. Function is function - cost is cost - if the product does the job, who gives a crap?

Again, if your spectators are focussing on your sound system and how "unprofessional" it looks - you need to work on your act.


If your spectators are focusing on your sound system it's because they can't hear you or it sounds so distorted that it is distracting.

You simply can't fill a large room with a boombox. It's about the audience's ability to clearly hear you in a larger venue; from the front of the room to the back.

PA's are designed for sound reinforcement and boomboxes are not. Boomboxes do not have the power to drive large speakers, there is no mixer on a boombox, they do not have the proper microphone inputs (XLR and 1/4"), probably no RCA inputs, they do not have separate channels to control individual volume levels and EQ settings and no master volume to control the volume of the overall mix.

Real PAs for small to mid-sized rooms are not that expensive. You'll need more power and larger speaker cabinets for doing larger rooms, auditoriums and outdoor settings. If you are doing professional gigs on a regular basis you will want to invest in a real PA. Use the right tool for the job and you'll sound (and look) professional.

Musicians Friend has several inexpensive PAs (under $300) and wireless mics.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigati ... 7c0&page=1


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:14 pm 
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tbwendt wrote:
dbaker_creator wrote:
tbwendt wrote:
Not super powerful but way more professional than a boombox - I think that would be pretty cheesy.


I've always found humor in the suggestion that "professional looking" magician equipment is somehow superior. Function is function - cost is cost - if the product does the job, who gives a crap?

Again, if your spectators are focussing on your sound system and how "unprofessional" it looks - you need to work on your act.


If your spectators are focusing on your sound system it's because they can't hear you or it sounds so distorted that it is distracting.

You simply can't fill a large room with a boombox. It's about the audience's ability to clearly hear you in a larger venue; from the front of the room to the back.

PA's are designed for sound reinforcement and boomboxes are not. Boomboxes do not have the power to drive large speakers, there is no mixer on a boombox, they do not have the proper microphone inputs (XLR and 1/4"), probably no RCA inputs, they do not have separate channels to control individual volume levels and EQ settings and no master volume to control the volume of the overall mix.

Real PAs for small to mid-sized rooms are not that expensive. You'll need more power and larger speaker cabinets for doing larger rooms, auditoriums and outdoor settings. If you are doing professional gigs on a regular basis you will want to invest in a real PA. Use the right tool for the job and you'll sound (and look) professional.

Musicians Friend has several inexpensive PAs (under $300) and wireless mics.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigati ... 7c0&page=1


I believe I covered this in a post on the first page.

If you are performing at a location that requires something larger than a boombox, chances are they already have a sound system in place. On the rare occasion that they don't, you can just rent one for the day.

If the sound is so bad that they can't hear you, then yes it's a problem; however, the matter you're describing has been addressed already. YOU do not need to buy the amp, because there will likely be one when you get there.

Back to "looking professional": You will not "look" any more professional if you have a better amp. People will hear you better, that's all. I continue to see alot of humor in the "looks professional" premise - especially since 90% of the times I hear it used it refers to some irrelevant aspect.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 3:46 pm 
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born to perform.

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Location: NJ
I have a different amp question. If you have a speaker and amplifier in one then wehre should the speaker be located. Should it be central (my guess is yes) but how high. On the ground so that it is at the children's ear level, or should it be on a table?

Ben Winter


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 4:21 pm 
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curlyclimber222 wrote:
I have a different amp question. If you have a speaker and amplifier in one then wehre should the speaker be located. Should it be central (my guess is yes) but how high. On the ground so that it is at the children's ear level, or should it be on a table?

Ben Winter


That will depend on the performance area. If you are performing in someone's living room (where you really shouldn't need an amp anyway) you should put it on a table. This will allow the sound waves to travel throughout the room with less interfearence.

Typically, the speaker should be centered in vertical space (8 ft. ceiling = 3-4 ft. speaker height). It should also be in a corner aimed outward towards the children if possible. This allows the sound to travel in the most direct path possible.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 5:22 pm 
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curlyclimber222 wrote:
I have a different amp question. If you have a speaker and amplifier in one then wehre should the speaker be located. Should it be central (my guess is yes) but how high. On the ground so that it is at the children's ear level, or should it be on a table?

Ben Winter


You can buy a PA speaker stand. Nearly all PA cabinets have a standardized fixture in the bottom of the cabinet for a speaker stand. These stands place the speaker at the right level for most applications.

Ground level is not the best place for speaker cabinets. At or slightly above ear level is appropriate in most cases. If the high range speakers are below your ears it's going to sound muddy.

We bought the all-in-one cabinet/mixer/amp combo because it is easy to transport. I have set up the single cabinet on the floor and it sounds a lot better off the floor. We point ours diagonally across the center of the audience.

You have move flexibility with a two cabinet setup. With 2 speakers, place them on each side of the stage tilted slightly inward to avoid a sound "hole" in front and to minimize reflection.

You'll also want any cabinets in front of your mic to minimize feedback.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 5:54 pm 
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k thanks. When i do shows i am almost always in a living room so i don't really konw much about amps.

Just to double check...If i am performing on a raised platform (roughtly two feet) then i should get a stand to get the speaker 2 feet or so up off of the platform so that it is roughly at the height of a seated person?

Ben Winter


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 6:30 pm 
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curlyclimber222 wrote:
k thanks. When i do shows i am almost always in a living room so i don't really konw much about amps.

Just to double check...If i am performing on a raised platform (roughtly two feet) then i should get a stand to get the speaker 2 feet or so up off of the platform so that it is roughly at the height of a seated person?

Ben Winter




A seated adult is approximately 4 feet tall. If you are on a 2 ft tall platform then yes, you should have a stand. The height of a seated person does depend on the chair they sit in, don't forget about that.

Again, living rooms will rarely require an amp.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 8:44 am 
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Location: Peterborough, ON
If you have a 2-way speaker system (that means the speaker has a low/mid speaker and a tweeter/horn) a good rule of thumb would be to have the lower speaker about your head height when you are standing. Like the post said above you want the tweeter/horn to clear your audience or else it will sound muddy and it will make it harder for people to hear you.


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 Post subject: Slow as molasses in April
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:08 am 
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Joined: 20 Feb 2008
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Okay, I'll admit it. Field Marshal Montgomery was a speed fanatic compared to how I have planned my campaign in magic. I shall also admit it has taken me almost three years and the use of ALL my tips( fairly impressive amounts at times) to prepare my self. My first purchase was the 767 portable sound system from Florida Magic. What convinced me to do this was an article I read in a journal from Florida magician, Dan Christopher. He wrote, "I don't know how many times the committee person hiring me has told me not to worry, they have a PA system at the club, school, etc. only to find out when I get there that the PA either doesn't work at all, is so old and outdated (undoubtedly donated by someone who realized it was useless), or is totally unsuitable for my performance (the microphone mounted on a podium!).

The solution, of course, is to carry your own portable PA system with you to every show. Should the venue have a very good system, great - leave yours in the car. However, if their system is not adequate, or they don't have one, you are prepared! This and my Axtell vent figure was it for two years of no-money"shows" for five year olds. ron0
:)


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 Post subject: Re: Slow as molasses in April
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 10:13 pm 
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Joined: 27 Sep 2006
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Location: Everywhere, but no where
rono wrote:
Okay, I'll admit it. Field Marshal Montgomery was a speed fanatic compared to how I have planned my campaign in magic. I shall also admit it has taken me almost three years and the use of ALL my tips( fairly impressive amounts at times) to prepare my self. My first purchase was the 767 portable sound system from Florida Magic. What convinced me to do this was an article I read in a journal from Florida magician, Dan Christopher. He wrote, "I don't know how many times the committee person hiring me has told me not to worry, they have a PA system at the club, school, etc. only to find out when I get there that the PA either doesn't work at all, is so old and outdated (undoubtedly donated by someone who realized it was useless), or is totally unsuitable for my performance (the microphone mounted on a podium!).

The solution, of course, is to carry your own portable PA system with you to every show. Should the venue have a very good system, great - leave yours in the car. However, if their system is not adequate, or they don't have one, you are prepared! This and my Axtell vent figure was it for two years of no-money"shows" for five year olds. ron0
:)


A good point. . . on to the subject of why we should always try to talk to an AV person at the venue.

I've never had the problem of a non-working sound system, so I'll leave that as is.


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