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 Post subject: Classic Audience Members (revised)
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 5:18 pm 
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born to perform.

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Classic Audience Members - the essay

This is a revision on my other essay. I have the same hopes in this essay as in the previous one. I hope to cover all the classic and common audience members and personalities of the audience as you may perform. I got this idea from Jay Sankey’s book Beyond Secrets, and just built upon its shoulders.

When you perform a show for an audience, no two of the audience members will have the same personality or character. In fact, there’s going to be lots of different people throughout the audience. And what I want to do today, is give you a handful of classic audience members you WILL come across. And this guide will teach you how to bring light from darkness.

Before I talk about the bad audience members, I want to touch on the ordinary, and cooperative audience members. Typically, most audience members are going to want to watch and enjoy the show you’ve put on for them. But this doesn’t mean these are the people I concentrate on the most, it means that they’re the people I have to concentrate the least on. This is because they don’t have any problems with the show. But the first audience member, you can spot first thing, is the shy person. This shy person will always be the one that’s in the corner of the room, not talking to anyone. They’re mostly likely and more often a woman than a man. Before the show, I suggest introducing yourself to everyone including “her,” so that you can get a clear impression of what she’s like.

From there, you want lower your energy. You never want to tell her to “loosen up” because that will simply make her more shy and reserved. To get “her” more engaged, you want to give her a reassuring smile and then immediately alter your attention to the main crowd or another member of the audience. And you typically want to glance over at her so that she feels more relaxed. And eventually, she will feel more relaxed.

The next classic audience member is Mr. Loud, and he is definitely more a man than a woman. You don’t need to search for him, because he’s usually going to pop out right in front of you. He’s usually calling out “funny” comments to be involved in whatever is happening. He’s always going to be the person to pick the card, grease the needle for Needle Through Balloon etc. What he really wants, is control. Mr. Loud is an insecure and controlling person. Everything has to be about him. How do you handle him?

So, the thing for you to do, is give him some of your attention – that’s right. Joke around with him, so when you go to another audience member, he felt like he got his attention. Depending on the type of Mr. Loud you get, he might still be obnoxious and loud. And if that happens, I’d just ask him to move to the back of the room, where none of the attention is at. It’s like preschool – if you’re not good, you get a timeout, and that’s just what he’s getting. If he still continues to be noisy and unruly, I guarantee you, most of the time, the rest of the audience will shut him up. And you don’t even have to do anything.

This next audience member is the worst one, in my opinion. He is the Know-it-all. Why does he annoy me? Because he thinks of magic as a series of puzzle pieces to be solved. I truly don’t want to be rude, but he is the “nerd” of the audience. What the know-it-all does, is explains or tells a theory of how to complete the trick in front of everyone. Yes, he is in most shows. You can’t do anything to stop his smartness or nerdiness, so all you can do to shut him up is, perform you most powerful effect, so he has nothing to say. Just let him realize that you put the show on, to perform, magic; not puzzles to be solved. Just hope that he doesn’t do anything to harm your show, again. But like most of the classic audience members, the other, good, audience members, will tell them to shut up.

A few years ago I was performing the card trick “Out of this World” to my family. Just to let you know before, my uncle is Mr. Loud AND Know-it-all, so try to handle that….at the end of the trick, he explained to everyone how it was done. I tried stopping him. I felt like crying, because I was so little and didn’t know what to do. But luckily, my cousins, aunts, and family told him to stop, “Don’t be an idiot,” they told him. He stopped.

So when a know-it-all explains a theory in front of audience, draw all your audience’s attention to whatever you’re doing in your hands (i.e. card trick, coin trick, mentalism bit etc.) and take like a few seconds to look up at the know-it-all, in a face where you’re telling him, “Don’t be such a party pooper. You’re a bigger person than that, aren’t you?”

Another character to work with is the Drunk Flirt. This person is the person who has been heavily drinking and too alcohol running through their body. Fortunately, I have never dealt with someone like this before. There is a difficult and dull connection between us that makes it tough to deal with these people. You can never tell them from their non-real or “real” emotions. For what I bring on the table, is real, I would want the same in return.

And last but not least, the Jerk. This is the second most challenging audience member to handle, in my opinion. It might sound like the Jerk and Mr. Loud have very much in common, but they really don’t. Mr. Loud wants to be in control, and the Jerk wants to screw things up for you and you look like a fool. But what they DO have in common, is that you can spot them really easily. There can be many things wrong with this person, for it could be a man or a woman. This first thing to do, is, as the Jerk makes his first rude and impolite comment, give him a big confident smile, saying “Don’t mess with me.”

Other ways to get the Jerk off your back, is to again, perform your most powerful effect or throw lots of one-liners at toward the jerk. Nothing too harsh but something that when he tries to make a run at me, I can shut him down, and that’s important.

Again, these are just a small handful of classic audience members: Shy, Mr. Loud, Know-it-all, Drunk Flirt, and Jerk. Look out for them, and now, I hope you might have an idea of what to do when you come across these situations.

Thanks for reading, and have a nice day!


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 Post subject: Re: Classic Audience Members (revised)
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:56 am 
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Joined: 18 Jan 2008
Posts: 30
SirJonIV wrote:
Classic Audience Members - the essay

This is a revision on my other essay. I have the same hopes in this essay as in the previous one. I hope to cover all the classic and common audience members and personalities of the audience as you may perform. I got this idea from Jay Sankey’s book Beyond Secrets, and just built upon its shoulders.

When you perform a show for an audience, no two of the audience members will have the same personality or character. In fact, there’s going to be lots of different people throughout the audience. And what I want to do today, is give you a handful of classic audience members you WILL come across. And this guide will teach you how to bring light from darkness.

Before I talk about the bad audience members, I want to touch on the ordinary, and cooperative audience members. Typically, most audience members are going to want to watch and enjoy the show you’ve put on for them. But this doesn’t mean these are the people I concentrate on the most, it means that they’re the people I have to concentrate the least on. This is because they don’t have any problems with the show. But the first audience member, you can spot first thing, is the shy person. This shy person will always be the one that’s in the corner of the room, not talking to anyone. They’re mostly likely and more often a woman than a man. Before the show, I suggest introducing yourself to everyone including “her,” so that you can get a clear impression of what she’s like.

From there, you want lower your energy. You never want to tell her to “loosen up” because that will simply make her more shy and reserved. To get “her” more engaged, you want to give her a reassuring smile and then immediately alter your attention to the main crowd or another member of the audience. And you typically want to glance over at her so that she feels more relaxed. And eventually, she will feel more relaxed.

The next classic audience member is Mr. Loud, and he is definitely more a man than a woman. You don’t need to search for him, because he’s usually going to pop out right in front of you. He’s usually calling out “funny” comments to be involved in whatever is happening. He’s always going to be the person to pick the card, grease the needle for Needle Through Balloon etc. What he really wants, is control. Mr. Loud is an insecure and controlling person. Everything has to be about him. How do you handle him?

So, the thing for you to do, is give him some of your attention – that’s right. Joke around with him, so when you go to another audience member, he felt like he got his attention. Depending on the type of Mr. Loud you get, he might still be obnoxious and loud. And if that happens, I’d just ask him to move to the back of the room, where none of the attention is at. It’s like preschool – if you’re not good, you get a timeout, and that’s just what he’s getting. If he still continues to be noisy and unruly, I guarantee you, most of the time, the rest of the audience will shut him up. And you don’t even have to do anything.

This next audience member is the worst one, in my opinion. He is the Know-it-all. Why does he annoy me? Because he thinks of magic as a series of puzzle pieces to be solved. I truly don’t want to be rude, but he is the “nerd” of the audience. What the know-it-all does, is explains or tells a theory of how to complete the trick in front of everyone. Yes, he is in most shows. You can’t do anything to stop his smartness or nerdiness, so all you can do to shut him up is, perform you most powerful effect, so he has nothing to say. Just let him realize that you put the show on, to perform, magic; not puzzles to be solved. Just hope that he doesn’t do anything to harm your show, again. But like most of the classic audience members, the other, good, audience members, will tell them to shut up.

A few years ago I was performing the card trick “Out of this World” to my family. Just to let you know before, my uncle is Mr. Loud AND Know-it-all, so try to handle that….at the end of the trick, he explained to everyone how it was done. I tried stopping him. I felt like crying, because I was so little and didn’t know what to do. But luckily, my cousins, aunts, and family told him to stop, “Don’t be an idiot,” they told him. He stopped.

So when a know-it-all explains a theory in front of audience, draw all your audience’s attention to whatever you’re doing in your hands (i.e. card trick, coin trick, mentalism bit etc.) and take like a few seconds to look up at the know-it-all, in a face where you’re telling him, “Don’t be such a party pooper. You’re a bigger person than that, aren’t you?”

Another character to work with is the Drunk Flirt. This person is the person who has been heavily drinking and too alcohol running through their body. Fortunately, I have never dealt with someone like this before. There is a difficult and dull connection between us that makes it tough to deal with these people. You can never tell them from their non-real or “real” emotions. For what I bring on the table, is real, I would want the same in return.

And last but not least, the Jerk. This is the second most challenging audience member to handle, in my opinion. It might sound like the Jerk and Mr. Loud have very much in common, but they really don’t. Mr. Loud wants to be in control, and the Jerk wants to screw things up for you and you look like a fool. But what they DO have in common, is that you can spot them really easily. There can be many things wrong with this person, for it could be a man or a woman. This first thing to do, is, as the Jerk makes his first rude and impolite comment, give him a big confident smile, saying “Don’t mess with me.”

Other ways to get the Jerk off your back, is to again, perform your most powerful effect or throw lots of one-liners at toward the jerk. Nothing too harsh but something that when he tries to make a run at me, I can shut him down, and that’s important.

Again, these are just a small handful of classic audience members: Shy, Mr. Loud, Know-it-all, Drunk Flirt, and Jerk. Look out for them, and now, I hope you might have an idea of what to do when you come across these situations.

Thanks for reading, and have a nice day!



man this essay is 100 times better tham the other esssay


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:15 pm 
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I liked it... good job!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:20 pm 
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Thank you Babidi and Drew! It means a lot. I will continue to write more essays as I come across the topics. :P

Thanks a lot guys!


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:28 pm 
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No problem... looking forward to the next one!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 5:39 pm 
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me two


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 7:42 pm 
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Joined: 06 Jan 2005
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Location: In some sweet limo, with a hot girl *wakes up and cries*
Not bad, I liked it....But you were gonna cry? It's just a trick, every time you are performing you are trying to "fool" someone. You will find out very soon, that you can't fool everybody, especially if they don't want to be fooled. And throwing your "best effect" at them isn't gonna fool them. If you floated up to a rooftop in broad daylight, sometimes, they still won't be impressed. It's not because they knew how you did it, it's because they don't want to give in and admit that you are good. Don't try to fight it, just roll with. See what I'm saying?

Just my opinion I guess,

-Trix


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 7:52 pm 
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mmroczka wrote:
Not bad, I liked it....But you were gonna cry? It's just a trick, every time you are performing you are trying to "fool" someone. You will find out very soon, that you can't fool everybody, especially if they don't want to be fooled. And throwing your "best effect" at them isn't gonna fool them. If you floated up to a rooftop in broad daylight, sometimes, they still won't be impressed. It's not because they knew how you did it, it's because they don't want to give in and admit that you are good. Don't try to fight it, just roll with. See what I'm saying?

Just my opinion I guess,

-Trix


Yeah, I get what you're saying. I was really young, so I didn't know any better to cry...now I know. hehe.

Thanks for the input!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:39 pm 
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Location: In some sweet limo, with a hot girl *wakes up and cries*
Oh, ok, I wasn't at all trying to sound like a jerk. You seemed to be some above crying, so I was rather confused when you said you were gonna cry. I didn't realize that this was not recent...Once again, good essay!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:47 pm 
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mmroczka wrote:
Oh, ok, I wasn't at all trying to sound like a jerk. You seemed to be some above crying, so I was rather confused when you said you were gonna cry. I didn't realize that this was not recent...Once again, good essay!


Haha, that's alright.

Thanks for the compliment!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:09 pm 
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I really liked the essay. I work renaissance festivals and come across a wide range of audience members.

You have the "shy" people and of course the "mr. know it all's" and the "mr loud's".

But more so with the "mr. loud's" because they are told that heckling is part of it all. In a theatre setting or a birthday party or a banquet hall somewhere...you have a little more theatre etiquette(spelling?). There will still be those hecklers and loud mouths...but for the most part the theatre sense will still be there (in general, can't say always but for the most part).

But outside...where there are already soo many distractions it creates a different set of problems and solutions. It took me several faires to get used to the fact that I have to be ready for anything.

There is another person that I run across is, since I usually do several shows a day (six a day at the last faire), people have seen the show before. Or caught part of it and had to leave but now are back and just watch the whole thing. These people are the worst for me, because they know exactly what is coming up.

They shout out what is the next part of the trick, or they will say the jokes along with you. Esp. my "fans" (if thats the right word for them...maybe stalkers? lol) who are back every faire looking for my show. They know the tricks, they know the jokes, they know the patter (My shows change from faire to faire, but I keep the same few tricks because people look forward to them and they are the best routines I have. I switch out the lesser known good tricks, but keep the better ones every faire).

These people are kind of in a group of their own. They have to be the center of attention, they are "Mr. Know It All" because they have seen it soo many times, definately "Mr. Loud" because they add their comments to everything, and they also become the "Jerk" because they won't cooperate and are there just to try and mess you up or make you lose concentration.

So now that I typed my own essay...lol....

I really liked the essay. Very helpful and I see all of those people every day I perform...never fails.

Looking forward to more essays. You have a good insight and are very detailed. And most of all it is well written and easy to read. (Thank God for punctuation and spaces) Read a couple on here and couldn't understand because of punctuation....or lack there of :)

GREAT ESSAY!


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PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 12:47 pm 
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Good essay you need to know how to handle each audience member correctly.

I like the drunk flirt tho lol


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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 10:54 pm 
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Pauldela wrote:
Good essay you need to know how to handle each audience member correctly.

I like the drunk flirt tho lol


Glad you got something out of it.

Thanks for reading.


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 4:56 pm 
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This is a really cool essay. It pretty much summerizes the types of audiences and what you have to do to deal with them.


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