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 Post subject: Would anyone here be offended?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 10:11 pm 
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born to perform.

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I have seen people on here telling others not to work for too cheap because it kind of hurts them as magicians in round-about ways. I want to get a job doing walkaround but as of now, the money isn't as important to me. The expirience is what i want. I get my liscense in Dec. so thats when I will start to try to get a job and I expect to go away to school next year so I would only be there for about 8 months any way.

The point is do you care if I offer myself for about 10$ an hour? I mean I'm only 17 and I've never done any thing like this. I don't think any more is possible for some one like me in this economy right now.

Thoughts?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:53 pm 
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Why offer $10 when you can easily get the gig for twice as much? The main deal with magicians is that if we sell ourselves too inexpensively, then it undercuts the whole market. I say go for 20 and stress that this is mostly a learning experience to your employer.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:19 am 
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Well Fred is outta his mind. YES I am OFFENDED (hope I stressed that enough.) The average charge for walkaround in my area (Cincinnati) is $100 to $150 an hour and this area is CHEAP compared to other areas of the country.

I will guarantee you that I will take away jobs from people charging even $50 an hour. the reason being that clients will remember the saying "you get what you pay for." The know that a cheap price means a cheap product.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:35 am 
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I disagree. If he makes clear that what he's doing is far below normal price, that he's learning, and draws parallels with an internship, he won't be costing anybody jobs. Also, do take my advice with a grain of salt, as it's my own two cents from doing other jobs, not magic. Paddy has done this longer, and knows what he's talking about.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:35 am 
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Fred531 wrote:
Why offer $10 when you can easily get the gig for twice as much? The main deal with magicians is that if we sell ourselves too inexpensively, then it undercuts the whole market. I say go for 20 and stress that this is mostly a learning experience to your employer.


unforunately, most people who hire entertainers don't want somebody who is wanting a "Learning Experience". They want somebody who knows what they are doing. Telling your employer that you want a learning experience is a very bad idea.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 12:04 pm 
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$10? i've had jobs where I sat and did close to NOTHING and got payed over $17 an hour.

:roll: are your tricks flawless and can you be entertaining?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 3:38 pm 
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Dude, 10 dollars is WAY to low, and I don't do restaraunts. You could do what Dan Fleshmen reccomends, and get part of it in cash and part in trade.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:51 pm 
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@ Fred: Who says I can easily get the job for twice as much?

@ Paddy: That's what I expected to hear, but I seem to remember you saying that you have 7 years of resturaunt expirience. (might have been someone else. idk) I don't have that. Also, how old are you? I'm 17 and I do think that makes a big difference. I do agree with the statement about you get what you pay for though.

@ sebis: Exactly, you've had jobs!! I'd like to think that I can be entertaining.

@chris: part in trade?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:27 pm 
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I commend you on wanting to take the step in performing in restaurants. It's tough work. I don't do restaurants anymore, and haven't in a few years, but I believe if this is what you want to do, charge what YOU think you are worth.

As for taking other magicians' jobs...how many other restaurant magicians are working in your city? And I really don't see you being serious competition to them. No offense, but you said you were inexperienced, and young. If other magicians are threatened because you want to give the restaurant work a try, then maybe it's time for them to retire. :roll:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:31 pm 
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MichalAngelo wrote:
I commend you on wanting to take the step in performing in restaurants. It's tough work. I don't do restaurants anymore, and haven't in a few years, but I believe if this is what you want to do, charge what YOU think you are worth.

As for taking other magicians' jobs...how many other restaurant magicians are working in your city? And I really don't see you being serious competition to them. No offense, but you said you were inexperienced, and young. If other magicians are threatened because you want to give the restaurant work a try, then maybe it's time for them to retire. :roll:
Wait until when?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:43 pm 
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Common sense. You can say that you will increase tips by far more than that.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 9:46 pm 
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Sweepingreaper4 wrote:
Wait until when?


I didn't say anything about waiting.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 10:35 pm 
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Sweepingreaper4 wrote:
@ sebis: Exactly, you've had jobs!! I'd like to think that I can be entertaining.


I just have to point out that was my first job (unless doing paper rounds count), I was 18, hadn't even finished college yet, and I quit it because it got boring doing nothing :P


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 12:35 am 
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It absolutely matters NOT how old you are or if you are inexperienced IF you can act professional, (when need be) are entertaining and people like you.
If you are not quite to that point, go to where people are sitting/waiting and practice; Airport, bus top/station, retirement home, coffee house, park, etc.

If you can act professional, are entertaining and people like you and the performance venue is a business, I recommend that you charge a professional fee of a minimum of $100 AND THEN offer an amount of performance time for that fee whether it's one hour, two hours or a whole evening, two shorter sessions, etc. You will present yourself more professionally this way and not as a starving student, amateur, desperate etc.
If the venue is busy then they can afford it. If the venue is not busy then you will be helping to increase their business. You could offer to help marketing and pass out flyers/menus while letting people know that you will be performing. Again, the venue can afford your fee.

Many restaurants have banquet rooms that are not being used during certain hours. You can negotiate to be featured during certain hours for a higher rate package. The owner will absolutely love to fill these extra seats.
Restaurants also have a "dead" time from around 2 PM to 4PM.
You could offer for instance, to help advertise and do a half-hour show at 3:30 in their banquet room. You can bet that the owner/manager will have you hand out some kind of promotion coupon so as to be busy with dinner guests at 4.

If it is a non-profit function feel free to charge/trade/donate what ever sounds good to you.

Tip policy? IMHO, don't push for tips, don't reject tips.
If for instance the restaurant owner absolutely does not want you to accept tips then negotiate for a higher fee.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 8:59 am 
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Joined: 17 Jul 2003
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Location: Greensburg PA Ring 158
Is your magic good?
Are you entertaining?
Do you have enough material?
Can you cover your mistakes?
Can you handle a Heckler?

The last two are what's make you different from a guy who does tricks and a guy who is professional. If you can handle a tough crowd and cover mistakes so they don't even look like mistakes then you should be good to go. But if you can answer yes (honestly) to all of those questions then you should try it. But you should have a little more self respect than that. Don't be afraid to charge more. I made the same mistake as you and in 1996 I worked for $15 an hour (I was 18). I was way better than that and the restaraunt expected a lot out of me.

Look at it this way. What is your time worth?

How much have you spent on magic in the last year?
How often do you practice?
How much time are you putting in to get ready for this gig?
How many hours are you planning on doing?
Will you have any replacements? (I use a new deck a performance day on average i.e weddings/walk around I give away a broken rubberband as well and a signed card)
What is all that worth?

All I am saying is that you need to stand up for yourself. Have some self-confidence in yourself. If you are worth getting paid then you are worth getting what you deserve.

I also agree with what EZ said but I also want to prepare you to hear the word No. Some people don't hear it most people do. It's a tough business and the economy is not making things any easier. Just keep trying.

That being said, if you are not very good you will get fired and you will give magicians a bad name. Be prepared for that. Handling yourself in pressure situations makes you a professional.

Adam

Paddy, I am sorry if this advice contradicts you. I believe in people taking chances.


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