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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 8:18 am 
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born to perform.

Joined: 10 Dec 2005
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Location: Newmarket, ON, Canada
No that's not what it depends on. The trick itself determines whether or not it is used in a show. Depending on it's strength when used in front of an audience. Additionally, if you have a show dealing simply with the power of your mind, I'm sure that the last thing you'd want to do is close it simply by exploding a light bulb. It has no real surprise to it. What I mean is this: sure it explodes, but that's it, where is the overall experience? I could see it as a good opener possibly, but it would definitely not be strong enough to be a closer for me.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:01 am 
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born to perform.

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It also depends on your stage character. My mentalism stage show is unmistakenly about "the power of the mind," but in its current incarnation, the show does not include the exploding lightbulb. The reason for excluding it is not the problem of flying glass (which I've solved without the need for a bag) or the relative strength of the effect (I agree, though, that it might not be a good closer). Rather, the reason is, quite simply, that my character is not telekinetic or parakinetic; I don't purport to have cultivated that ability. I have other abilities -- a very specific, limited set of abilities.

That's one of the ways in which, IMHO, magician-thinking can ruin a mentalism act. Magicians tend to do a lot of different effects in their shows, and by "effect" I don't mean "trick"; I mean the items on those lists of 8 or so core effects in magic (I think Fitzkee has one): appearances, disappearances, multiplications, transformations, levitations, restorations, etc. The audience more or less accepts (and perhaps expects) that all of those effects belong together because they are all magic and all magicians can do them. Ever notice how, when someone asks you if you "do that trick with X that Y did on tv", they get disappointed, perhaps even a bit haughty, if you say that you don't or can't?

With mentalism, though, being able to manifest/demonstrate 8 distinctly different psychic effects in a single show can actually undercut your credibility. Most "real" psychics tend to manifest a single ability, perhaps two... rarely three or more. Psychics that purport to have a large set of different abilities tend to eventually get exposed as frauds.

Being asked to do a trick and saying, "Sorry... I don't have my cards on me" sounds lame and can undercut the perception of you as a "magician." Being asked to bend a key and saying, "Sorry... I'm not telekinetic" sounds credible and can lead to a discussion/demonstration of the skills you do possess.

It's to your advantage as a mentalist to clearly define the specific set of abilities your character possesses and why he/she possesses them. It will anchor you as a performer and help you develop a more solid, credible performance. For example, if you purport to have cultivated the ability to connect with people on a psychological, emotional, and perhaps even a parapsychological level through years of observance of human behavior, study of relevant literature, and constantly putting yourself in positions in which you can practice empathizing with, conversing with, and reading people, it makes no sense for you to turn around and make a lightbulb explode, no matter how cool it looks.


Last edited by TheCaffeinator on Thu Mar 05, 2009 12:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:20 am 
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born to perform.

Joined: 21 Jan 2008
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Location: Canada
TheCaffeinator wrote:
It also depends on your stage character. My mentalism stage show is unmistakenly about "the power of the mind," but in its current incarnation, the show does not include the exploding lightbulb. The reason for excluding it is not the problem of flying glass (which I've solved without the need for a bag) or the relative strength of the effect (I agree, though, that it might not be a good closer). Rather, the reason is, quite simply, that my character is not telekinetic or parakinetic; I don't purport to have cultivated that ability. I have other abilities -- a very specific, limited set of abilities.

That's one of the ways in which, IMHO, magician-thinking can ruin a mentalism act. Magicians tend to do a lot of different effects in their shows, and by "effect" I don't mean "trick"; I mean the items on those lists of 8 or so core effects in magic (I think Fitzkee has one): appearances, disappearances, multiplications, transformations, levitations, restorations, etc. The audience more or less accepts (and perhaps expects) that all of those effects belong together because they are all magic and all magicians can do them. Ever notice how, when someone asks you if you "do that trick with X that Y did on tv", they get disappointed, perhaps even a bit haughty, if you say that you don't or can't?

With mentalism, though, being able to manifest/demonstrate 8 distinctly different psychic effects in a single show can actually undercut your credibility. Most "real" psychics tend to manifest a single ability, perhaps two... rarely three or more. Psychics that purports to have a large set of different abilities tend to eventually get exposed as frauds.

Being asked to do a trick and saying, "Sorry... I don't have my cards on me" sounds lame and can undercut the perception of you as a "magician." Being asked to bend a key and saying, "Sorry... I'm not telekinetic" sounds credible and can lead to a discussion/demonstration of the skills you do possess.

It's to your advantage as a mentalist to clearly define the specific set of abilities your character possesses and why he/she possess them. It will anchor you as a performer and help you develop a more solid, credible performance. For example, if you purport to have cultivated the ability to connect with people on a psychological, emotional, and perhaps even a parapsychological level through years of observance of human behavior, study of relevant literature, and constantly putting yourself in positions in which you can practice empathizing with, conversing with, and reading people, it makes no sense for you to turn around and make a lightbulb explode, no matter how cool it looks.


Greaaaaaat post.

I enjoyed reading that.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 12:57 pm 
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Instead of the exploding light bul, I did a Spoon bend/break..

I little more visual, and less messy.

Question:

Those that do the lightbulb, do you use the clear kind (as suggested) or the frosted? I like the little puff the frosted kind makes, but the clear is...well...clear so nothing hidden.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 1:34 pm 
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Quote:
Greaaaaaat post.

I enjoyed reading that.


Ditto- sums it up well- better than the average penguin post- so thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 1:41 pm 
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Ruse wrote:
Instead of the exploding light bul, I did a Spoon bend/break..

I little more visual, and less messy.

Question:

Those that do the lightbulb, do you use the clear kind (as suggested) or the frosted? I like the little puff the frosted kind makes, but the clear is...well...clear so nothing hidden.


I use both (whatever they have in stock at the discount store)....but
- I use a 4 pack from the dollar store- hand them out for someone to pick one out of the box and then say "If you need some lightbulbs you can keep the other three as a souvenier (nobody so far has taken them home)
but it does say "these are regular non-gimmicked bulbs" without saying "these are regular non-gimmicked bulbs"


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 9:50 am 
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Chris Smith demonstrated his exploding light bulb at our Magic Meeting this week. His motivation for enclosing the bulb inside a zip-lock bag...was to remove doubt of tampering. He adds the clip to the bag to prevent himself from being able to physically interact with the bulb. He first mentally concentrates and the bulb starts to light up. Once the bulb is fully lit, it shatters (apparently from his mental powers). I agree that the clip is suspicious looking.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 4:15 pm 
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And the little spasm he has before the bulb explodes.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 5:14 pm 
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I fully intend on using the Magic Smith light-up bulb and exploding bulb as a kicker to my Haunted Mentalism Show.

I personally have safety issues with NOT using a baggy. That or provide the first three rows of your audience with safety goggles.

I saw a magican perform the exploding bulb trick, ala Mesika's gimmick, and I was in the front row. I, along with several other people, felt flecks of glass hit us in the face when the bulb exploded. This was a stage presentation and the magician was a good 8 feet down-stage.

Also this was the opening act, so until the intermission, the second and third performers were "crunching" and slipping on the stage because of the broken shards of glass.

Otherwise I think its a strong effect IF the audience is not expecting it.

I plan to inject spiritualism and ghosts into the patter to set-up the "Lighting" of the bulb and the breaking of the bulb will be a shock or surprise...

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The Magic & Illusion of Georges-Robert

http://www.mysteryandillusion.com


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 7:53 am 
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George, what's your justification for putting the bulb in the baggy?


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:35 pm 
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Probably the same as the one I'm going to use. To prove that I can't tamper with it. My friend bought the lighting bulb and exploding bulb from Magic Smith and used them a week later. It killed. I'll be picking them up myself pretty soon.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:14 pm 
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I really love Smith's handling of Big Bang with Lightning.

The bulb starts lighting up with a flicker in the bag, and then shatters. Vry strong. :)

Though Yesika's I think is the cleanest IMO. And can be done with very thin wine glasses which is pretty cool.

8)


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