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 Post subject: Tricks
PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2005 9:12 pm 
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Sponge balls

3D RABBITS OF COURSE

If doing a close-up show try to put in one small illusion such as a Joker Tube

Do not do a wrist chopper or something similar ive seen it done and the magician made so much anticipation and the birthday boy ran crying to his mom and you do not want that

A magic coloring book and dissaperaing crayons works great also


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 6:41 am 
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Personally, I DO use a wrist chopper, but it is presented in a comedic type way. Of course the kid will run scared to his mommy if you freak 'em out and scare them with that blade!

I present the Disecto with David Ginn's routine (Which I have tweeked to fit my own act) It works and the crowd loves it!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 3:26 pm 
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But would anyone even want to RISK that a child would break down into tears at the site of the wrist chopper? Or for that matter, would anyone want to RISK that a child might go home and try the same effect with a sharp kitchen knife?

Even if the children find it amusing, the parents likely will not (and remember, these are the people who book you). We live in an extremely paranoid and protective culture. Anything that has the potential of putting a child at risk will be viewed negatively.

Anytime you are entertaining for children, there is a very strong social responsibility that goes along with the gig. Whenever I am called for a show, I always point out that there is no element of danger to the show, and I always ask if any of the children have allergies to foods or animals. Parents are extremely appreciative of any performer who thinks of these details.

Even if you are relatively new to performing for children, an express knowledge and concern for such details implies a sense of professionalism and experience to the client. Quite often, it makes the difference between getting the booking or losing it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 5:26 pm 
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I agree that you have to be careful and suggest asking while booking if the parents mind a trick like Disecto. I do have to say though, I also use this type of trick (like kylethegreat) with kids and I perform it in a comedy manner and people love it, I have not had any problems.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 6:44 am 
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magicman845 wrote:
But would anyone even want to RISK that a child would break down into tears at the site of the wrist chopper? Or for that matter, would anyone want to RISK that a child might go home and try the same effect with a sharp kitchen knife?

Even if the children find it amusing, the parents likely will not (and remember, these are the people who book you). We live in an extremely paranoid and protective culture. Anything that has the potential of putting a child at risk will be viewed negatively.

Anytime you are entertaining for children, there is a very strong social responsibility that goes along with the gig. Whenever I am called for a show, I always point out that there is no element of danger to the show, and I always ask if any of the children have allergies to foods or animals. Parents are extremely appreciative of any performer who thinks of these details.

Even if you are relatively new to performing for children, an express knowledge and concern for such details implies a sense of professionalism and experience to the client. Quite often, it makes the difference between getting the booking or losing it.


Okay...maybe I should have mentioned that I tell the child before hand what I plan to do with them, and as far as the kitchen knife goes, during the presentation (at the very beginning) I say NEVER TRY THIS AT HOME!

The parents do enjoy the trick as they have the entire time that I have been performing it! As a matter of fact, that is one of the favorite effects of many of the adults at performances.

Booking is not a problem for me. I have been performing professional for children for many years now and over the period of time that I have been performing, I have built up quite a good presentation and business reputation. I always take safety into hand as well as allergies myslef. It is always important to check with parents on certain topics.

by the way: the arm chopper is only performed at my larger shows (such as festivals, children events, etc.) I dare not take it to a birthday party!

Have you ever used any type of trick that adds the element of "danger" to your show? If not, you should give it a try but do it with a comedy type routine so it goes by the audience easier. You would be surprised at the reaction.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 9:14 am 
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KyletheGreat wrote:
Okay...maybe I should have mentioned that I tell the child before hand what I plan to do with them, and as far as the kitchen knife goes, during the presentation (at the very beginning) I say NEVER TRY THIS AT HOME!

The parents do enjoy the trick as they have the entire time that I have been performing it! As a matter of fact, that is one of the favorite effects of many of the adults at performances.


Respectfully, when performing an effect like Disecto in front of young children, a warning to "Never try this at home" is not enough. How often do parents have to remind their kids not to run across the street? How often do parents have to reprimand their kids for playing ball in the house? The fact is, children have short memories when it comes to the "don'ts" in life.

Children are naturally governed by impulse. Even if they emphatically promise to you that they will never try this at home, there is always a risk that they will forget the admonishment as soon as the show is over.

Similarly, the parents may love the show at the time it is presented, but how impressed will they be with you a week afterwards when they are taking the kitchen kife out of their son's hands? Of course, we will never hear of these negative comments since we have long since packed our bags and moved on to another gig.

In short, it's not just the entertainment value during the show that we are responsible for - it is also the long term social, moral and behavioral impact that our show has on the children. I know that not every magician feels this way, and I'm not trying to change anyone's mind. But as a parent, I would never hire a magician who would even appear to put my child at risk, through either the effect itself or the message that he is sending.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 2:40 pm 
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Ahem...

Guns are used constantly in movies today, (yes even kids movies) but does that result in all the children running around looking for guns in their house and shooting them at people?

No. It doesn't.

Most children know better than to grab a knife and start sawing on somebody's arm any ways. And even if they didn't they would start on the first touch!

Children are not going to go home and start cutting themselves up because of a magician's trick!

All the time children are making references to people getting sawed in half at other magic shows...does that mean that they had gone home and tried sawing somebody in half? No. Dangerous stuff is done in magic constantly and kids see it probably more than adults! BUT THIS DOES NOT RESULT IN THE CHILDREN TRYING IT!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2005 8:58 am 
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Isn't it a logical step that children who play with guns may be more likely to grow up to be adults who play with guns? And yes, every year you hear of an unfortunate incident where a child has found his daddy's gun and either killed himself or someone else.

The magic show may not be the DIRECT CAUSE of dangerous incidents, and it may not be the ONLY CAUSE, but it perpetuates the risk. As an entertainer with a social conscience, I have a responsiblity for what message I am sending to my audience.

As for the cutting in half analogy, how many kids have a big box with solid steel blades at home? Those stage illusions are so far removed from reality that no one would ever have access to the props needed.

In contrast, there are similar effects such as Visible Sawing. Most children's performers will not include this illusion in their shows for fear that some child may get hold of their dad's skill saw and hurt themselves.

Maybe the RISK of that happening does not bother you. But it bothers me and every parent I have ever explained this to appreciates the sensitivity and care I have for their kids. I don't expect to change anyone's opinions in this matter, but there are so many other effects out there with which you can entertain children, I don't see the need to include dangerous effects in my show. I can entertain children without putting them at risk.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2005 4:11 pm 
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DWmagic wrote:
...I find it handy to have a magic box made out of tape or somthing that you can put down on the floor. Kids have to sit inside the magic box (it has to be quite big). This will keep them from getting to close and them seeing how the trick is done...

You can buy what are basically mats with footprints on them (or for the smart ones you could make your own) and they work as markers and have the magical property of making kids stick to them (no it doesnt involve superglue!).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 3:30 pm 
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KyletheGreat wrote:
Personally, I DO use a wrist chopper, but it is presented in a comedic type way. Of course the kid will run scared to his mommy if you freak 'em out and scare them with that blade!

I present the Disecto with David Ginn's routine (Which I have tweeked to fit my own act) It works and the crowd loves it!


David Ginn is great, I have one of his books on kid's magic. Also, Samuel Patrick Smith has some good books. I have "Kiddie Patter and Little Feats"

GREAT for kid's show information, routines, and overall control.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 11:23 am 
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eminem102892 wrote:
Hippity Hop Rabbits
Strat o Phere (none of that joker tube crap)
PB&J Illusion
Sponge Balls



Joker tube is a lot better then strat o sphere


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 8:57 pm 
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Tip over box and arabian circus tent :D
Aaron
Magiteer


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 12:06 am 
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sluggo142 wrote:
Tip over box and arabian circus tent :D
Aaron
Magiteer


did you build it yourself?


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 Post subject: Re: The Kids Show Equipment Guide
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:35 am 
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jakbauer wrote:
Post what you think is Neccessary or handy for a Kids Show here.


A large colorful plastic tote, sitting on a restaurant tray stand - it's great as a prop case! A small tripod table may be needed, too. I use a Viking tripod with a cutting board for a top, with elastic looped around it to keep small props from blowing away when outside.


Last edited by AlanMunro on Wed Jul 06, 2005 11:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2005 5:44 pm 
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kids are nessesary


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