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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 7:36 pm 
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born to perform.

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craig161 wrote:
I disagree I think dvds are better
im dislexic and I would rather watch a trick than read it
and to get a real good book cost a lot more than to get a real good dvd


Both of your points are flawed. First of all, last time I checked, having dyslexia affected your abillity to write--not read. Additionally, there are many great dyslexic magicians. They didn't have access to DVDs when they were learning. Why should that block you?

Also, your second point is completely untrue. Art of Astonishment Volume 3 has more/about the same amount of material as Volumes 1,2,3, and 4 of Bill Malone's On the Loose DVD series. The DVD series, in total costs about 130 dollars, while the Art of Astonishment book costs about 50. These are rough estimates, so don't start correcting, I know these are probably wrong. I'm just giving a general ballpark.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 1:56 am 
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Penguin

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if you know exactly what you want, then I would say DVDs may be a better choice. However if you want a wide range of tricks on one apparatus then of course books are the way to go. For instance there are many books that are solely on cards but I only need to know 5 really good card tricks. In this instance I would go with a DVD in order to view the handling

I am however a big fan of books about performing in general and how to relate to certain audiences (for example kids).

I guess there is no real answer as long as you practice enough to perform the trick flawlessly and add your own flare to truly make it yours.

that’s my two cents


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 10:44 am 
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born to perform.

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I'd also have to agree that books excel over DVDs, because the fact is that you get more tricks for your money, and also, many of whom we consider the great magicians weren't around when DVDs were common (or even existent), so the only way we can gain thier knowledge directly is from books.

Ironically, I am the proud owner of one, two, three, mumble, mumble, 25 magic DVDs and 18 books and booklets. The reason for this is because as a child, I found learning from DVDs easier because they were more visual, and watching a screen is much more appealing to today's generation (myself included) than reading a book.

However, I'm in the process of buying more books and selling my one-effect DVDs.


magicdjw wrote:
First of all, last time I checked, having dyslexia affected your abillity to write--not read.


From Wikipedia: Dyslexia refers to any reading difficulty not associated with obvious problems such as bad eyesight. ... Dyslexias include the inability to name letters, to read words or sentences, or to recognize words directly even though they can be sounded out. Dyslexia is not limited to reversing the order of letters in reading or writing, as is often implied in popular culture; it may, for instance, include unexpected spelling mistakes and unusual syntax


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 3:08 pm 
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Well I'll be. My second two points, however, still stand uncorrected.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 3:12 pm 
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dyslexia is reading an writing trust me i know
and i didnt say it was a block for me i said it was easyer for me
to watch a dvd
but yes i think your rite about the price
good point
thinking about it books are better in some ways
because when you watch a dvd you use the same patter as the magician your watching but if you read a book and learn a trick you use your own patter because books only have a out line of patter


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2006 7:54 pm 
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I used to suffer from Dyslexia but I am KO now.

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat
Join DAM now!!!!!
Mothers Against Dyslexia


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 Post subject: Re: Books vs. DVD's
PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2006 8:33 pm 
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Sunnydolan wrote:
Ask any magician who does magic for a living and they will say 99% of the time that they have learned more from books then they have from DVD's.


Maybe so, but ironically enough one of the best authors of one of the best magazines/books to ever be printed (The Magic Menu) states: "DVD is really the best choice for magic instructional media -Jim Sisti." I think saying "99%" is a little far-fetched, and an inaccurate percentage, especially these days. The reason being is, not as many even bother reading books to begin with, as they wish to take every shortcut possible.

Now back about 20 years ago, maybe 99% would be more accurate, as DVDs were not available. Granted I am also from the old school of "book learners," but I see DVDs as a great new learning tool for those who choose to supplement them in with their reading, as opposed to replacing books entirely. After 26 years of magic thus far, I do not have that many DVDs—I only have some of the classic sets. However so far I have thoroughly enjoyed what I have watched, and actually was able to grasp the information a lot quicker by actually seeing it done live by a performer.

With books, some may miss key elements as far as timing and misdirection goes. But like I also said, I was already well grounded in magic long before I even seen a DVD. So my prior knowledge helped me to learn much more quickly. I think DVDs are a great new learning tool as long as they are used for the right reasons. Not simply because one is too lazy to read, or is looking for instant gratification. DVDS should be used to "fill in the gaps" so to speak, not replace books.

They provide a great visual reference, and allow another magician to come into your home for personal instruction. Some older magicians tend to become jaded, and antiquated in their own solidified and outdated ways. They refuse to evolutionize simply because they fear something new, or hold resentment because this was not available for them when they were first learning, so why should everyone else be able to just jump in and freely access all the knowledge that they had to spend years reading?

I felt the same way, and still do to a point. I believe beginners should also go the book route for starters, as books provide far more material for a much better price. I think that if one sticks to only DVDs, they are actually cheating themselves out of a lot of knowledge, a lot more that could ever be found on DVDs. So build your foundation with books, and supplement it with DVDs from time to time.

Just make smart, and wise decisions. Beware of high priced i"ndividual effects" as well, and only buy what gives you the most bang for your buck. This is why I only stick to the "classic sets."


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 Post subject: Re: Books vs. DVD's
PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 2:07 pm 
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sirbrad wrote:
...not as many even bother reading books to begin with, as they wish to take every shortcut possible....I think DVDs are a great new learning tool as long as they are used for the right reasons. Not simply because one is too lazy to read, or is looking for instant gratification. DVDS should be used to "fill in the gaps" so to speak, not replace books.

They provide a great visual reference, and allow another magician to come into your home for personal instruction. ...I believe beginners should also go the book route for starters, as books provide far more material for a much better price. I think that if one sticks to only DVDs, they are actually cheating themselves out of a lot of knowledge, a lot more that could ever be found on DVDs. So build your foundation with books, and supplement it with DVDs from time to time. ...


WELL SAID,
I just hope that those that READ this will follow the advice given. Reading does allow for one to develop one's own performance style because they cannot SEE what they are learning doen by anyone else and just in that respect books are superior. Alas, kids nowadays do not read the same way we all did and do.

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 02, 2006 1:30 am 
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Posts: 42
curlyclimber222 wrote:
oztheozzie wrote:
But like I said before, DVD's are equally important to me. I think that Books and DVD's should be used to compliment each other.


I completely agree with this. BTW another con for books is when you are in the middle of something and you have to flip the page it gets very annoying.

But still I prefer learning from dvd's because I find them more entertaining, but I know I won't learn as much from them. So my resources are 50% books and 50% dvds/vhs.

ben winter


I agree as well. I use both, but to put it in a nutshell for me lately...

videos/dvds for sleights
books for (mostly) theory


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 1:31 pm 
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I agree with this, but one flaw there is with books. Many of them can't stay open on a surface, and you have to hold it open with one hand. Really annoys me, some books will stay though. I like both Books and DVD's.

Also, DVD's are something where you know exactly what is there and there are no suprises. yet books are packed with all kinds of things. Mark Wilson's book for example:

Sponge Balls
Cups and balls
coins
cards
stage
ordinary objects
etc. etc. etc.

But DVDs help you learn faster, and learn it well. Multiple camera angles really help, and you get a better idea on how it should work.


Last edited by Philal on Sun Feb 17, 2008 9:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 8:40 pm 
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craig161 wrote:
i disagree i think dvds are better
im dislexic and i would rather watch a trick than read it
and to get a real good book cost a lot more than to get a real good dvd


I'm slightly dyslexic, however it just depends sometimes.

If the book has good illustrations and in depth description then its fine, however if its very broad its really hard to understand.

Books are alot cheaper, yes. HOWEVER how long is it going to take you to read the book? and how long is it going to take you to watch a DVD????

Time is Money :D

DVDs have a visual aspect that one can see rewind and perfect.

DVDs might not be as rich in content or bang for your buck but its the future and more tricks can be mastered with a crappy DVD teaching style then medium teaching style of books.

something really bad with DVDs is people don't only learn the moves and sequences BUT they learn the magicians style which is not very healthy as a magician should have there own style.

Anyway i don't believe that one is better than the other and thats my opinion :D


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2008 10:41 pm 
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Both are good. Books are good because they are cheap for lots of information but DVDs may be easier to learn from. You can see exactly how to do the move. I think every magician can't get just books or jsut DVDs but you need a mix. about half and half.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 4:21 am 
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Seeing exactly how to do the move is only half the story. Many moves also demand a discussion of the subtleties involved, exactly where pressure must be put, clear viewpoints with transparent fingers and more... Much of this explanation is clumsy when spoken. If DVDs included menus of line drawings you could refer to, 3d graphical visualisations and a carefully-planned script they could be onto something. I've yet to see a DVD which hasn't dispensed with the best parts of study from a book. These things need documentary production values, not one camera, a couple of studios, and people talking and explaining off the top of their head while performing. While in principle the format could be good, it's hardly being used to its full potential.


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 Post subject: Re: Books vs. DVD's
PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:52 pm 
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sirbrad wrote:
Sunnydolan wrote:

Now back about 20 years ago, maybe 99% would be more accurate, as DVDs were not available. Granted I am also from the old school of "book learners," but I see DVDs as a great new learning tool for those who choose to supplement them in with their reading, as opposed to replacing books entirely. After 26 years of magic thus far, I do not have that many DVDs—I only have some of the classic sets. However so far I have thoroughly enjoyed what I have watched, and actually was able to grasp the information a lot quicker by actually seeing it done live by a performer.

With books, some may miss key elements as far as timing and misdirection goes. But like I also said, I was already well grounded in magic long before I even seen a DVD. So my prior knowledge helped me to learn much more quickly. I think DVDs are a great new learning tool as long as they are used for the right reasons. Not simply because one is too lazy to read, or is looking for instant gratification. DVDS should be used to "fill in the gaps" so to speak, not replace books.


The next step here really, is to have an actual magician right next to you and teach you. I still think DVDs > Books. In terms of learning


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2008 5:28 pm 
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I generally find learning actual techniques easier from a book than from a person. A demonstration is great for seeing a routine or presentation, but not for actual sleight-of hand. Explanations need to be very carefully planned and thought through, and they rarely are in person, unless the situation is a prepared lecture. The only way I can learn difficult sleights directly from a person is if they are very patient and happy to repeat themself a lot. Book format tends to pace itself ;-)


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